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10 Things I Wish I Had Known Before My Dad’s Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

When someone receives an Alzheimer’s or other dementia related diagnosis, there is an array of emotions for the patient and their family – disbelief, denial, anger, loss, confusion and so much fear. What will this mean for our family?  Before my dad received the first diagnosis of “mild cognitive impairment,” we knew things were off. He’d gotten lost a few times and was repeating himself, but it was all manageable. His friendly personality and quick wit was a good cover, but dementia is a relentless foe and it marched on. As my siblings and our mother adapted to a new normal, things would change again and again.   Our wonderful dad passed away a few months ago, giving me some time to reflect on his Alzheimer’s journey.…

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