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3 Ways to Help Overcome Working Mom Guilt

Working mom guilt is common when juggling your career, family and personal time and feeling like you’re short-changing your kids. Finding a work-life balance can be challenging in itself, let alone trying to find time to attend to your basic needs and practice self-care. It can take some time to adjust to parenting and having a career. Don’t let your feelings minimize your success — use these tips to combat working mom guilt and show yourself some love. 1. Choose Your Battles Your parenting may look different than other moms you know. Your situation is unique to you and your family, so don’t let others’ opinions get you down. Unsolicited advice can trigger guilt and cause you to feel shame for working — don’t let…

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Constant Calibration and Working Moms

With COVID-19 devastating our world, working mothers are faced with the responsibility of continuing the juggle, but in many cases with no childcare and the new weight of homeschooling. In addition, mothers are losing their jobs during the pandemic at a higher rate than any other group. Many of us are wondering what else could possibly be coming our way and how are we supposed to manage it?

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7 Tips to Help Working Moms Prioritize Our Health

Working moms need to prioritize our health. With many of us heading back to the office and yet another change to our routines is disrupting our lives, our overall wellbeing is suffering. Add balancing your job with motherhood — childcare, packing lunches, dishes, laundry, and more — it is critical that we make time for self-care and move our health to the top of our priority list. Many working moms avoid or even forget about self-care because they simply don’t have time for it. If this sounds familiar, stay tuned. These simple tips will allow you to put your health at the top of your to-do list without finding extra time for it. Why It’s Important for Working Moms to Prioritize Our Health Oftentimes, we…

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4 Self-Care Practices to Disconnect from Work

Why do we need self-care practices to disconnect from work? As we cope with the stress of phase 2 of the pandemic, many women are headed back to the office. Finding a healthy work-life balance seems to be more difficult than ever. Imagine this: You finally leave the office after a long day at work. You’re exhausted, and can’t wait to get home. But in the car, you start thinking about that project you’re working on, or that client, or that meeting tomorrow. You’re filled with worry and self-doubt, and you can’t stop thinking about work the whole way home. You get home and you are still thinking about it. Your body is physically at home with your family, but your mind is still at…

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Stop managing your time and start managing your energy

You know the drill. Work, family and other obligations have you running ragged, and there’s always the feeling that there aren’t enough hours in the day. You’re stressed and exhausted, but sleep isn’t replenishing you. You struggle with productivity, your patience is thin, and the work you once loved just isn’t providing the same satisfaction anymore. That’s burnout. We would rather call it something else, an energy crisis. Burnout sounds like something you can’t come back from, but an energy crisis? Personal energy is renewable, you just have to know where to look for it.   That’s what personal energy management is all about, finding the sources of energy you need to get off the hamster wheel and back in the game in a way that…

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Burnout…It Happens to the Best of Us

Burnout …It Happens to the Best of Us. In comparison to their male colleagues, many working women experience unfair work environments. You may have heard the stories…leadership positions and promotions are more difficult to obtain, contributions don’t receive the same amount of credit, views and voices shared at meetings are not heard until re-stated by a man, and professional roadblocks are hit as a result of the belief that being a career woman and a caregiver don’t mix. On top of these examples of workplace oppressions, and what seems to be the never-ending list of others, working women in opposite-gender relationships have a greater role in housework and childcare. Unfortunately, the Vegas rule (“What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas”) does not always apply here.…

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