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A Leadership Approach to Diversity

Organizations that are truly interested in creating a dynamic and positive culture that celebrates diversity need to dismantle management thinking and embrace a leadership model. Whereas management is grounded in ideas that seek to control and maintain, leadership is committed to vision, breaking molds, and inspiring change.

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By Gina Messina, Ph.D. About a year ago, a friend introduced me to Kakeibo, the Japanese art of budgeting and applying mindfulness to our spending, and I’ve been obsessed ever since. You see, I am a major contributor to our consumeristic culture. I see something shiny and I think I have to have it. A friend jokes that she hates going shopping with me because I have to pick up and touch everything on the shelves (although I’ve eliminated that practice due to COVID!).  Like so many of us, I am easily persuaded by marketing tactics. Now that we so rarely spend cash, it feels like I can simply swipe a card, click a button, or use my fingerprint and suddenly I have a new…

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Leading with Gratitude

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What Makes a (Woman) Leader?

You may be familiar with Daniel Goleman’s article, “What Makes a Leader?” It’s been considered a groundbreaking piece that is often referenced when discussing leadership and emotional intelligence. No doubt, it offers critical insight; however, it fails to acknowledge gendered differences in leadership and the “labyrinth” women must navigate to take their rightful place at the helm.  Women and men have different paths to the top, with women holding far fewer high-level leadership positions. Intersectional factors have an even greater impact on one’s ability to climb the ladder.  As Goleman points out, research demonstrates that emotional intelligence is a key factor in leadership success. Yet, women and men display different strengths in EI. Likewise, a lifetime of operating in male dominated spaces have created particular…

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The post-pandemic workplace is littered with uncertainty for workers in all industries, especially women. While the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic has passed, the lack of a steady workplace for women is still a prevalent problem. COVID-19 and Women’s Employment During the COVID-19 pandemic, women were 33% more likely than men to work in an industry shut down by the pandemic. Research indicated that jobs held by women were 1.8 times more vulnerable than those held by males. Women made up 39% of the employment on a global scale, but they accounted for 54% of the job losses worldwide. Economists also report that women were much more likely than men to be furloughed during the pandemic. In addition, women were furloughed for longer periods than…

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Empathy makes you a better leader. In general, women are perceived to be the most “empathetic” gender, and the science says there may be some truth to that perception. One study found that women are better at feeling others’ pain; female brains react more to images or videos of a person being in pain than male brains. It turns out that high empathy is a very positive thing for women in the workplace, especially if they’re in leadership positions. A recent report by Catalyst found that, especially in the post-pandemic workplace, empathy is a critical leadership skill that influences important factors like innovation and employee satisfaction. There’s no doubt about it: empathy is a necessary skill to have as a leader. Here are 3 benefits…

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