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Minda Harts’ The Memo and How to Address Work Place Racism

Minda Harts on workplace racism
How to address workplace racism. I recently read Minda Harts best-selling book The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table. She’s a professor of public service at NYU Wagner, host of the podcast Secure Your Seat, and the CEO of The Memo, a career development platform for women of color. To begin, it is important for me to acknowledge that I am not a woman of color, but I am an ally and am always focused on reading about ways I can become more aware of the many forms of racism and oppression that exist in our communities and contribute to positive change. Likewise, I believe our youth – including the students in my classroom – are…

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