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Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield Shares Insight Into Women in the Workplace

An interview with Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield about her blog, Women are Advancing in the Workplace, but Women of Color Still Lag Behind. Why is your topic important to study?  It is important to study underrepresented groups in the workplace, because these experiences give better insight into understanding how our current workplaces can be improved to maximize human capital. Americans spend a significant amount of our time at work, and it is increasingly tied to other functions (health care, retirement), but we also know that work is fundamentally unequal. People of color are concentrated into lower paying, less prestigious jobs, and women of all races experience widespread pay disparity, sexual harassment, and blocked paths to leadership. It’s critical to understand how these processes occur so…

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Women are Leading the Great Resignation

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Minda Harts’ The Memo and How to Address Work Place Racism

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The impact of intersectionality in the workplace

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