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COVID-19: For Women It’s One Step Forward, 30 Steps Back

We came across an interesting study by Dr. Gema Zamarro and her colleagues entitled “Gender Differences in the Impact of COVID-19”. Dr. Zamarro is a Professor and 21st Century Endowed Chair in Teacher Quality in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas. We invited  Dr. Zamarro to discuss how the research brief findings are relevant to working women. Below are her responses. Why is your topic important to study? The current COVID-19 crisis has the potential to drastically magnify gender gaps in terms of both childcare arrangements and work. With its social-distancing requirements, the COVID-19 pandemic had its biggest effect on more female-dominated sectors of the service industry and as a result, in contrast to other economic crises that affected more male employment,…

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