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Why Many Organizations Don’t Prioritize Women’s Leadership and How They Can Start

women leaders need to be prioritized in the workplace
As women, we have come to understand and acknowledge how being successful at work can be more challenging for us than our male counterparts. Many women must balance their advancing careers with motherhood, healthy relationships, and personal wellness. Women are also more likely to face sexual harassment at the workplace, leading them to remain silent and subservient in their jobs or leave their careers altogether. You may think that in 2021 the vast majority of businesses have a good understanding of the difficulties women face in the workplace but sadly, this is not the case. While some employers are making great strides in gender equity, many companies are still falling short of providing women the opportunities to excel in their careers. A recent study by…

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