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What Makes a (Woman) Leader?

You may be familiar with Daniel Goleman’s article, “What Makes a Leader?” It’s been considered a groundbreaking piece that is often referenced when discussing leadership and emotional intelligence. No doubt, it offers critical insight; however, it fails to acknowledge gendered differences in leadership and the “labyrinth” women must navigate to take their rightful place at the helm.  Women and men have different paths to the top, with women holding far fewer high-level leadership positions. Intersectional factors have an even greater impact on one’s ability to climb the ladder.  As Goleman points out, research demonstrates that emotional intelligence is a key factor in leadership success. Yet, women and men display different strengths in EI. Likewise, a lifetime of operating in male dominated spaces have created particular…

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Leading with Gratitude

Gratitude is often overlooked as a critical aspect of leadership. We spend many of our waking hours at work and as a leader, you are responsible for creating a culture where both you and employees thrive. Gratitude cultivates the mental attitude and temperament necessary for effective leadership. It shifts the tone of the workplace so that employees feel appreciated and are inspired to be part of the big picture. Research demonstrates that gratitude offers physical, psychological, and social benefits: Gratitude leads to stronger immune systems, lower blood pressure, better sleep, and motivation to care for one’s self. Being thankful produces joy, happiness, optimism, and overall positive emotions; it also allows us to feel more alert and aware of our surroundings.Grounding in gratitude results in more generous,…

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Why Many Organizations Don’t Prioritize Women’s Leadership and How They Can Start

As women, we have come to understand and acknowledge how being successful at work can be more challenging for us than our male counterparts. Many women must balance their advancing careers with motherhood, healthy relationships, and personal wellness. Women are also more likely to face sexual harassment at the workplace, leading them to remain silent and subservient in their jobs or leave their careers altogether. You may think that in 2021 the vast majority of businesses have a good understanding of the difficulties women face in the workplace but sadly, this is not the case. While some employers are making great strides in gender equity, many companies are still falling short of providing women the opportunities to excel in their careers. A recent study by…

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The impact of intersectionality in the workplace

Intersectionality in the workplace: the implications on leadership. During the 2012 presidential election, Oprah Winfrey shared that she was continually being bombarded with questions about who she would support: Barack Obama, the Black candidate, or Hillary Clinton, the female candidate.  She said that the question assumed that she could split her identity. But as a black woman, she couldn’t, she identified with both of them. In that moment, Winfrey gave us a window into the experience of intersectionality. She sparked a conversation about a concept that has been voiced for decades by those at the margins of mainstream America.  Read more: What is intersectionality and why is it important?  Seeking to highlight that one’s lived experience cannot simply be reduced to the sum of racism…

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